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Christendom students woke up early this past Saturday, October 24, and drove into nearby Northern Virginia with a powerful mission: to prayerfully protest the evils of abortion with the Diocese of Arlington’s Bishop Michael Burbidge. Their shared witness proved to be a powerful one, with others joining them to pray rosaries and stand for the rights of the unborn.

Throughout the academic year, Christendom students can be found praying at the same abortion clinic in Falls Church, Virginia, giving up generously of their time to pray for the unborn. College students spending their Saturday in prayerful protest is a powerful statement, and one that inspired freshman Halyna Charba to make the trip up to Northern Virginia.

“I wanted to stand up for what I believe in,” says Charba. “I come from rural Texas and haven’t had this kind of opportunity before. Being able to put my beliefs into action in this prayerful way was so important to me, and being able to do so with Bishop Burbidge was an amazing experience.”

Christendom’s prayerful protests are organized by the college’s Shield of Roses pro-life group, which has existed since the college’s founding. Since 1977, the group has achieved success, with two abortion clinics prayed at by Shield of Roses shutting down over the years. The group’s efforts have been applauded by Bishop Burbidge, with the bishop joining the group on multiple occasions — including this past Saturday.

The diocese’s Respect Life office also helped organize the protest on Saturday as part of the 40 Days for Life campaign, with members of the Knights of Columbus, seminarians, and others joining as well.

Fighting for the rights of the unborn is a cause that unites the Christendom community throughout the year, whether it be at Shield of Roses on Saturday mornings or at the annual March for Life in Washington, D.C. Their witness is a cause for hope and a rallying cry to continue praying for an end to abortion in the country and in the world.

Christendom College admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.