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Christendom College’s student body, faculty, and staff marched with thousands to prayerfully protest abortion at the 47th March for Life this past Friday, January 24. Providing a voice for the voiceless around the country, the Christendom community rallied together around this crucial cause, making a bold statement for life as a result.

Christendom’s student body has dealt with the problem of legalized abortion since the college’s founding in 1977, just four years after the passing of Roe v. Wade into law. Rather than accepting this reality, students have marched against it, with college faculty and staff joining them every year at the March for Life — making Christendom one of the only colleges to not schedule classes on the day of the March. This year was no different, with the college chartering buses in order to bring the entire community into nearby Washington, D.C., for the March.

This year’s March was the first for many freshmen, and they joined another significant figure in that fact: President Donald Trump attended the March for the first time, marking the first time a President has attended and spoken at the March. After listening to his address, students prayed rosaries and shared in a collective spirit of joy and hope — one that was ultimately inspiring for senior Annie Sullivan.

“From Mass, to the drive, to the March itself, students, faculty, staff, and the families of Christendom College marched with joy and prayed with sincerity for the unborn children of our country and the world,” said Sullivan. “Marching with Christendom and many other Catholic schools reminded me that that there is hope for the pro-life movement, hope for mothers in need, and hope for our unborn children.”

The March is always packed with people from across the country, but this year’s crowd was even larger than usual. While the pace may have been slower as a result, the size of the crowd was a testament to the pro-life movement being larger and stronger than ever.

“Each year at the March for Life, we see the numbers of pro-life citizens grow and, as it does, so too does the voice raised for the voiceless. Every year that voice becomes louder. Every year there is a little more hope. Every year, I believe, we take a step closer to protecting the sanctity of life under the law of this country,” says Sullivan.

Christendom students have taken a stand for the unborn since the college’s founding, from taking part in the March for Life and leading it on four occasions (in 1984, 1998, 2009 and 2012) to organizing student pro-life groups, such as Shield of Roses and Students for Life. The latter took place the day after the March, as it always does on Saturday mornings during the academic year. Students prayerfully protested at an abortion clinic in the metropolitan D.C. area, praying that it, too, will close — just like two other abortion clinics that students have prayed at over the years.

The perseverance and passion of the Christendom community for the pro-life movement has been a constant for over 42 years, and one that remains with students long after they graduate from the school. Alumni, such as Live Action vice president of strategic partnerships Lauren Merz (’10), are pushing the pro-life movement continuously forward, and inspiring others to join the cause.

For sophomore George Schuberg, the March for Life is more than one day — it is something that unites, strengthens, and makes the Christendom community better as a result.

“Being in a tight group of your fellow students, faculty and staff is heart warming and shows that we are truly passionate in the pro-life movement. I love that Christendom closes campus in reverence of the countless innocent lives that have been lost. Marching with Christendom is a memory that I will carry with me long after I graduate,” says Schuberg.

Christendom College admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.
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